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French Food Friday...Raymond Blanc's Blackcurrant Charlotte

 

 photo and recipe from here


Bonjour mes belles,

This week's recipe is inspired by the lovely maman de Felicity who served boudoirs or ladies fingers bicuits with tea this afternoon, in the dining room of their "fairytale like" chateau.

I cannot think of a nicer place to enjoy a good cup of tea...

Raymond Blanc's Blackcurrant Charlotte

Many great chefs have created recipes especially for beautiful women, noble kings and queens, and other heads of state. The renowned French chef Carême devised this dessert to honour Queen Charlotte (1744–1818), wife of George III.


Makes: 2
Preparation time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 10 minutes
You will need:
For the sponge:
4 medium eggs, separated
2 tsp lemon juice
80g caster sugar
80g plain flour, sifted
40g icing sugar, sifted, for dusting
For moistening the sponge:
60g caster sugar
140ml water
4 tsp kirsch or eau-de-vie

For the mousse:
1.5kg blackcurrants
100g caster sugar
1 tbsp water
4 sheets leaf gelatine
600ml prepared sabayon
For the sabayon:
4 medium egg yolks
50g caster sugar
125ml Muscat or other sweet dessert wine
1 tbsp lemon juice, or to taste
150ml whipping cream
For the blackcurrant glaze:
2 sheets leaf gelatine
250g blackcurrants
40g caster sugar
100ml water

Method:
1. For the sabayon: In a large heatproof bowl, whisk the egg yolks, caster sugar, wine and lemon juice together for one minute. Stand the bowl over a bain-marie of barely simmering water, making sure it is not touching the water, and whisk for seven to eight minutes until it reaches 78°C, resulting in a light fluffy sabayon.

2. Remove the bowl from the heat and place over a larger bowl of crushed ice. Continue to whisk until the sabayon is cold. In another bowl, whip the cream to soft peaks and then fold into the cold sabayon. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.This sabayon can be poured onto any fruits, warm or cold. It can also be frozen.

3. For the sponge, preheat the oven to 190ºC/gas mark 5. Line a baking tray, about 30 x 40 centimetres, with greaseproof paper. On the paper, draw two 14 centimetres circles (for the bases) and a 10 x 25 centimetres oblong (for the sides), then turn the paper over.

4. Using an electric mixer on full power, whisk the egg whites with the lemon juice and half the caster sugar to form soft peaks. Gradually whisk in the rest of the caster sugar and continue to beat until firm. Turn the speed to low, add the egg yolks and carry on beating until well mixed in. Remove the bowl from the machine then, using a spatula, gently fold in the sifted flour; do not over-mix.

5. To pipe the sponge: put the sponge mixture into a piping bag fitted with the 8 millimetres nozzle and pipe a continuous line of adjoining sponge fingers onto the paperlined tray, side by side, from one end of the stencilled oblong to the other, making sure you go right to the edges. Pipe the remaining mixture over the stencilled discs, to make two 14 centimetre sponge rounds

6. Dust the sponge with icing sugar, leave for five minutes and then dust again. Bake in the oven for eight to ten minutes until cooked and lightly coloured. Leave to rest for fifteen minutes, then peel away the paper.

....bon appetit à tous, Leeann x

Comments

  1. Oh wow, that looks incredible - yum!

    Angela x

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beautiful! Thank you so much for the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks absolutely amazing.... have a wonderful weekend. S xx

    ReplyDelete

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{fabulous shop in St Emilion, photo taken by moi}
Bonjour from a sunny but chilly SW France,

Hope that you had a nice weekend. We spent yesterday afternoon at a furniture auction but I will tell you more about that later in the week.

Last weekend we bought a lot of wine cases as we thought that they would make good storage, as shown in the photo above.

I particularly liked the idea of making a set of drawers with them or perhaps even a serving tray like this.

{photo from here}
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